Posts Tagged ‘immigrant’

Inmigrantes Indocumentados Demandaron Al Gobierno De Donald Trump

Miércoles, septiembre 20th, 2017
Inmigrantes Indocumentados Demandaron Al Gobierno De Donald
Un grupo de seis inmigrantes indocumentados demandaron al gobierno de Donald Trump el lunes ante un tribunal federal de San Francisco por la decisión del presidente de poner fin al programa de Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia que otorga a 800.000 jóvenes inmigrantes indocumentados, conocidos como DREAMers, el permiso para vivir y trabajar en Estados Unidos.

En la demanda argumentan que el gobierno de Trump no siguió los procedimientos administrativos correspondientes para rescindir ese programa y que su revocación representa una violación de las leyes de debido proceso.

DACA fue establecido en el año 2012, durante el gobierno de Obama, tras años de organización de los movimientos de base formados por jóvenes estudiantes indocumentados. Quince estados y el distrito de Columbia también iniciaron un juicio contra el gobierno de Trump por sus planes de derogar DACA.

Dulce García es una de los demandantes y además es abogada de inmigración, que regularmente defiende a otros inmigrantes en los tribunales de California y vive en Estados Unidos desde que su familia inmigró proveniente de México cuando ella tenía cuatro años de edad.

A continuación compartimos la entrevista que dio para democracynow.org

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: We’re continuing to look at the struggle over DACA. That’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives nearly 800,000 young people legal permission to live and work in the United States. On Monday, six DACArecipients sued the Trump administration in a San Francisco federal court over its plans to rescind the program. The lawsuit argues the Trump administration failed to follow proper administrative procedures in rescinding DACA and that revoking the program violates due process laws. DACA was instituted by President Obama in 2012 after years of sustained grassroots organizing by young undocumented students. Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have also sued the Trump administration over its plans to end DACA.

AMY GOODMAN: Among the six plaintiffs is Jirayut Latthivongskorn, a fourth-year medical student who’s been living in the United States since he and his parents moved from Thailand when he was just nine years old. Two other plaintiffs are middle school teachers. Another plaintiff is Dulce Garcia, an immigration lawyer who regularly defends other immigrants in court in California. She’s been living in the United States since her family immigrated from Mexico when she was four years old. So we’re going to San Diego, California, to speak with her.

Dulce Garcia, welcome to Democracy Now! Can you lay out what this lawsuit is all about and who you’re representing, not to mention yourself?

DULCE GARCIA: Hi. Thank you so much for having me. On a personal level, what this lawsuit is to me, it’s a way to speak, to tell our stories, to tell who we are, to tell the stories of our parents and their sacrifices, as well, because although the dialogue has been centered around us as DREAMers, it’s clear and evident from the lawsuit itself that there was support from our parents all the way through to make sure that our dreams came true. So, for me, this lawsuit means a voice for us. We’re speaking on our own behalf. And we’re filing the lawsuit on behalf of 800,000 DACArecipients. So, it’s a very personal lawsuit. Being a lawyer, I trust our judicial system, and I am placing full faith on them to do what is right for us.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Well, tell us your own story and how it came to be, one, that you ended up as a lawyer and benefited from DACA yourself. Talk about your family’s journey.

DULCE GARCIA: Yeah. Well, actually, the last memory that I have of my home country was when we were robbed at the border in Tijuana, in Tijuana, Mexico. That’s the very last memory that I have of my home country. I’ve been here for over 30 years now. And it’s been a difficult upbringing. We arrived in San Diego, which is a beautiful city. We settled there, loved it, but we struggled. We struggled at times with homelessness. Growing up, we had so much fear of our local police. We had fear of not just immigration officers, but also just in general authority. We would never step into a government’s office to ask for help for anything. So, my family, we would find ourselves, our siblings and I, sleeping under a table, because my parents, at that time, couldn’t afford a home for us, so we would rent out areas of a home. So, we had a difficult upbringing, to say the least. We definitely lacked healthcare.
But we knew that with hard work that we would—we would be able to accomplish our dreams. And my dream, from very small, was to become a lawyer. In my mind—not realizing that I was not a U.S. citizen, in my mind, I was going to become a lawyer, a criminal defense lawyer, and work for the federal government as an FBIagent. And this is based on the books that I was reading, the TV that I was watching, and just looking around my neighborhood at the abuse by police at that time. It just inspired me to go into a field in criminal defense. I didn’t realize that I was undocumented and my dreams would be deferred for a very long time. And it’s still a struggle, ‘til today, to keep going and accomplish those dreams. And they’ve changed somewhat. Now my area of focus is immigration, simply because I find that I have to understand my parents’ situation, my own situation and those of—in my community. But yeah, growing up, I didn’t realize that I was undocumented, and I thought everything that we were going through had to do with just being poor. I didn’t realize that a lot of what we went through, a lot of our experiences were precisely because we were undocumented.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Well, to explore that further, can you talk about the condition that your family was in? Your father was a welder. And could you talk about what your mother did? And also, you’ve spoken about the impact in terms of healthcare to your family, the lack of—the fact that you didn’t have health insurance, largely because your family was undocumented.

DULCE GARCIA: Right. I didn’t step into a dentist’s office until I was an adult.

Yeah, my dad is a welder. He did work unlawfully for another person. And at one point, he injured his arm. He shattered his arm and his wrist in several places. And we didn’t have health insurance, so for over a week he just worked through the pain, and not realizing that it was exponentially getting worse. He just toughened it up. And when, finally, we realized that his arm was getting infected, we went to a doctor. And he told us that had he waited any longer, he might have had his hand amputated, because it had gotten so bad. But we were just so terrified of seeking help, because of all the rhetoric going around us that it wasn’t safe to go out of our home.

I didn’t get to experience everything that San Diego had to offer. I had a very sheltered life. I didn’t go to the park, see the beaches. I didn’t go to Disneyland, even though I could hear—I kept hearing all kinds of things from classmates about Disneyland. And it wasn’t until an adult that I actually was able to do that on my own, without depending on school field trips to go out, aside from—out of my home. So, it was a tough upbringing, because we felt terrified all the time. We felt scared all the time to step outside of our house, even to go to the movies or something like that.

We wouldn’t do anything, really, that would be compromising our stay here, because we had a goal. My parents had a vision for us, and they didn’t want to compromise that. So they made sure that we would be very sheltered. And because of that, I also didn’t quite understand the reasons for it. I just, growing up, thought my parents were a little tough on me, and they were—I just assumed that a lot of the things that we were limited to doing was because we were poor.

But as far as the healthcare, whenever any of us would get sick, we would toughen it up as much as possible. We didn’t have the regular checkups. And luckily enough, we were pretty healthy, considering the malnutrition that we suffered through—

AMY GOODMAN: Dulce Garcia—

DULCE GARCIA: —for quite a bit of time.

AMY GOODMAN: I wanted to ask—

DULCE GARCIA: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: You’re not the first to sue. I mean, 15 states have sued around President Trump rescinding DACA. But you’re the first DACA recipient, representing other DACA recipients, to sue. Can you talk about the significance of this and your fellow DACA recipients, like the Thai medical student that you’re representing?

DULCE GARCIA: Yes. I want to emphasize that the people that are named plaintiffs in this lawsuit, this is just a very small sample of the 800,000 DACA recipients. We’re not the best of the best. We’re not the brightest. We’re not the most accomplished. This is just a very small sample of what the 800,000 DACA recipients are doing in our community. They are just so amazing, and so many of them are doing such great work in our communities. But the named plaintiffs are very incredible people. So, I feel very privileged to be working with them and working with the team behind this lawsuit.

But I want to emphasize that, you know, the 800,000 DACA recipients, we’re in our communities. We’re teachers, doctors, lawyers and mothers and hard-working parents, hard-working fathers, wanting to provide for their families. And a lot of them are in incredible schools and doing incredible work for our communities. And, to me, the fact that we are, in a way, providing a voice for the 800,000 DACA recipients, I am more than honored to be.

AMY GOODMAN: Before we wrap up, can you tell us the grounds on which you’re suing?

DULCE GARCIA: Yes. It’s several grounds. One of them is the promise that we relied on. We relied on the government telling us, “Come out of the shadows, give us your information, and you won’t be deported. You’ll renew your DACA permit for two years.” And I very much depended on that. I have a practice, and I just opened a second law firm this year. And I signed a five-year lease this year in May, thinking that I would be able to renew this DACA work permit. And so a lot of us depended on this promise of the government saying, “If you step out of the shadows, you do the right thing, you follow the rules, and we’re going to protect you.” And I went out into the community as a lawyer asking people to sign up for DACA: “Come out of the shadows. You’re going to be saved. It’ll be a life changer for you. There’s so many benefits to being able to walk around without the fear of being deported.” And now I am scared and terrified—

AMY GOODMAN: Oh, it looks like we have just lost our satellite feed with Dulce Garcia. Dulce Garcia, an immigration and criminal defense lawyer in San Diego. She’s one of six DREAMERs who have sued the Trump administration—she’s one of six DREAMers who have sued the Trump administration over its plans to rescind DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. She’s been in the country since she was four years old.

When we come back, President Trump’s childhood home in Queens is now, well, renting out as an Airbnb. So some refugees stayed overnight and talked about their dreams. Stay with us.

Última Actualización: Septiembre 20 de 2017
Fuente: www.democracynow.org

Tell Congress: Stand up for Dreamers

Viernes, septiembre 8th, 2017
Tell Congress: Stand up for Dreamers

The petition to Congress reads:
Pass clean legislation to reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program with no strings attached and block all right-wing attempts to use DACA as a bargaining chip to insert legislative poison pills to expand immigration enforcement, wall off our borders, or ramp-up attacks on other immigrants and refugees.

The white supremacist in chief just struck again. Donald Trump killed the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and put more than 800,000 immigrants at risk of deportation.1

DACA gave immigrants who came to the United States as children, known as Dreamers, the ability to obtain driver’s licenses and work permits and live safely in the only country many of them have ever known. President Obama created DACA after thousands of undocumented young people took the risk to come out of the shadows and fight for protected status.

Trump knows that ending DACA is cruel and unpopular. He was too cowardly to make the announcement himself and has now put Dreamers’ fate in Congress’ hands. Republicans in Congress have had a bigoted, anti-immigrant agenda for years. And Trump premised his entire administration on a racist war on immigrants. Now, Trump and his racist party want to use Dreamers as a bargaining chip to advance their hateful agenda and put other immigrants at risk. Now more than ever, we must stand with our allies in the immigrant rights movement and make our demands crystal clear: No trade-offs. No compromises.

Democrats and Republicans of good conscience must pass clean legislation to reinstate DACA with no strings attached. They must also stop right-wing extremists from using Dreamers as a bargaining chip and inserting legislative poison pills to expand immigration enforcement, build Trump’s wall or shut down our borders. Can you add your name?

Tell Congress: Immediately restore and expand DACA by passing clean legislation without any poison pills from the extreme right wing. Click here to sign the petition.

When Trump set his anti-immigrant agenda in motion, he said that Immigration and Customs Enforcement would focus on removing dangerous criminals from the country and told DACA beneficiaries that they could “rest easy.” Trump was lying. His rogue deportation force has targeted and attacked all immigrants since day one of his racist regime. Going after Dreamers is just another way to advance his white supremacist agenda and terrorize immigrant communities.

Racist, anti-immigrant attorneys general from 10 states threatened to sue the Department of Justice if it did not end DACA by Sept. 5.2Their threats gave Trump license to kill the program. Trump says he admires Dreamers, but he is a coward and a liar. His attempt to shift the burden to Congress and give them six months to act is nothing more than a desperate attempt to appear compassionate and use Dreamers as political cover to advance his reckless and dangerous anti-immigrant agenda. Trump is now planning to phase out DACA, saying that current DACA beneficiaries will not be impacted until March 2018. But we cannot trust him to keep his word. To protect Dreamers, Congress must take bold action immediately.

Democrats and Republicans have already introduced the 2017 DREAM Act and The American Hope Act, sister bills that would restore and expand DACA.3 If Congress passes the 2017 DREAM Act as-is, with no amendments, it would:

  • Immediately protect current Dreamers from deportation.
  • Raise the program’s age entry requirement to 18. Immigrants who entered the country before the age of 18 would qualify for DACA under the new law.
  • Expand eligibility for DACA to include college students, members of the military, workers and full-time caregivers of minor children.
  • Add new paths to citizenship for Dreamers.

Dreamers embody the spirit of the United States in a way that small minded xenophobic Republicans like Trump will never understand. They came to the United States with parents who made the courageous and extremely difficult decision to leave their families, communities and countries of birth behind in the hopes of building better lives. Some families are displaced by war, others by climate change or corporate greed. All are seeking refuge, freedom from persecution and better economic opportunities for their families. There is nothing more American than that. Trump’s attacks on immigrants are attacks on the very fabric of our nation. We must push Congress to act now.

Tell Congress: Immediately restore and expand DACA by passing clean legislation without any poison pills from the extreme right wing. Click here to sign the petition.

Government funding is set to expire at the end of September, and Trump has threatened to shut down the government if Congress does not approve funding for his southern border wall in a broader must-pass government funding bill.4 Our activism pushed Senate Democrats to block funding for Trump’s wall before. Together, we can do it again. That is why CREDO is teaming up with our friends at United We Dream to make sure Democrats and Republicans of good conscience advance strong legislation to reinstate and expand DACA and stop anti-immigrant Republicans from leveraging the program to ramp-up immigration enforcement or wall off our borders.

Restoring DACA will not protect all immigrants from Trump’s hate, but it would bring us one step closer to reaching that goal. Can you help us make sure Congress takes a stand for Dreamers and does not use them as bargaining chips?

Tell Congress: Immediately restore and expand DACA by passing clean legislation without any poison pills from the extreme right wing. Click the link below to sign the petition.

https://act.credoaction.com/sign/trump_daca?t=8&akid=24844%2E13254089%2EncCIB_

Thank you for your activism,

Nicole Regalado, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

P.S. Click here to find an emergency #DefendDACA event near you.

Sing the Petition

References:

1. Matthew Yglesias, “Trump isn’t delivering his own DACA policy because he’s cowardly and weak, ” Vox, Sept. 5, 2017.
2. Molly Ball, “How Immigration Hardliners Are Forcing Trump’s Hand on DACA, The Atlantic, Aug. 31, 2017.
3. E. A. Crunden, “Sweeping new effort aims to protect undocumented immigrants, ” ThinkProgress, July 28, 2017.
4. Matthew Cooper, “Wake Trump up when September ends: President, Congress face debt limit, government shutdown deadlines, ” Newsweek, Aug. 28, 2017.

Última Actualización: September 08 de 2017
Source: www.act.credoaction.com

Trump Administration’s Anti-Immigrant Hate

Miércoles, agosto 30th, 2017
Trump Administration’s Anti-Immigrant Hate

To see evidence of the Trump administration’s anti-immigrant hate, just look at the 2018 federal budget.

We all know Trump is targeting immigrants, terrorizing communities, and separating families. But his increasingly harsh immigration enforcement policies and other anti-immigrant efforts will cost money — a lot of money. And this gives us a crucial chance to stand up to him. Are you with us?

Trump and Congress are trying to move forward with a federal budget that provides over $6 billion for more enforcement agents, more detention centers and beds, and his infamous wall. To do this, they’ll strip money from programs that millions of people rely on, like Medicaid, SNAP (food stamps), and social security. People will suffer on on all sides of this toxic deal, and we need to stop it.

Tell your members of Congress: Not One Dollar in the budget should go to Trump’s hateful anti-immigration agenda.

Here’s a breakdown of how Trump and Congress would take from important, helpful programs to further attack immigrants:

Trump Administration’s Anti-Immigrant Hate
 

Your members of Congress need to know that you want the budget to help people, not support hate. Sign the petition to say Not One Dollar to Trump’s deportation force! .

Thanks for taking action,

Reform Immigration FOR America

Publication Date: August 30 2017
Source: https://reformimmigrationforamerica.org/

Pentagon May Deport Immigrants Who Have Served in the Military

Viernes, julio 21st, 2017
Pentagon May Deport Immigrants Who Have Served in the Military

Written by Melissa Cruz

The Pentagon is considering halting a program that allows immigrants with urgently needed skills to serve in the military, putting the thousands of soldiers promised expedited citizenship in exchange for their service at risk for deportation.

According to an undated Defense Department memo, the Pentagon may terminate the Military Accessions Vital to National Interest program (MAVNI), an initiative that has allowed noncitizens with specialized linguistic and medical skills to enlist in the military and receive fast-tracked citizenship. Since the program’s launch in 2009, these immigrant troops have filled in the gaps for jobs deemed critical to the military’s operation, but are in short supply in American-born troops.

The memo, however, cites the “potential threat” posed by these immigrant troops, referencing their “higher risk of connections to Foreign Intelligence Services.” Officials have now assigned threat level tiers to the 10,000 troops in the MAVNI program—the majority of whom serve in the Army—despite the rigorous vetting they endured to enter the military in the first place.

Attorney and Retired Lieutenant Coronel Margaret Stock, the founder of the MAVNI program, told NPR that these security concerns were exaggerated: “If you were a bad guy who wanted to infiltrate the Army, you wouldn’t risk the many levels of vetting required in this program.”

Other immigrants would not even be able to reach basic training—ending the MAVNI program would also cancel the contracts of recruits in the delay-entry program, a holding pool of recruits awaiting their assigned training date.

As a result, 1,800 enlistment contracts for immigrant recruits would be cancelled, putting roughly 1,000 at risk for deportation. Those recruits’ visas expired while waiting for the military’s travel orders. An additional 2,400 part-time troops would also be removed from service.

The Pentagon also plans to subject roughly 4,100 service members—most of whom are already naturalized citizens and have been deployed around the world—to “enhanced screening,” though the memo acknowledges the “significant legal constraints” of “continuous monitoring” of citizens without cause.

Stock said the Pentagon’s proposal may violate the U.S. Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause.

“They’re subjecting this whole entire group of people to this extreme vetting, and it’s not based on any individual suspicion of any of these people,” the former lieutenant colonel said. “They’ve passed all kinds of security checks already. That in itself is unconstitutional.”

Though the program itself may have been an Obama-era initiative, immigrant troops have aided the U.S. military for centuries, dating all the way back to the Revolutionary War. To cut this essential program now—particularly as the Trump administration calls for a heightened military presence around the globe—may not only be unconstitutional, it is a disservice to centuries of American military tradition that has relied on the skills of foreign-born service members.

Photo by MarineCorps NewYork

Publication Date: July 21 2017
Source: www.immigrationimpact.com

Broken H-1B Visa Program is Costing American Jobs

Sábado, marzo 29th, 2014
Compete America, an association of high-tech companies advocating for reform of immigration policies affecting higher-skilled workers, launched a job loss calculator today estimating the numbers of American jobs lost due to the lack of H-1B visas, the primary work visa for higher-skilled workers. The calculator estimates that 500,000 new U.S. jobs could have been created this year absent outdated restrictions on H-1B visas. From another perspective, according to Compete America, the 2.37 million new payroll jobs created in 2013 might have been increased by 21 percent under a different H-1B scheme.

The calculator highlights the fact that higher-skilled immigrant workers grow the U.S. economy, drive cutting-edge innovation, and create more jobs for everyone, including native-born U.S. workers, as noted by the Washington Post. According to a new report by Standard & Poor’s, “Adding Skilled Labor to America’s Melting Pot Would Heat Up U.S. Economic Growth,” highly skilled immigrants help create jobs for American workers, they don’t take them away. Higher skilled workers complement U.S. workers’ skills instead of competing with them, are more likely to start a new business than U.S.-born workers, and increase innovation and productivity, according to S&P. Research from the National Foundation for American Policy suggests the hiring of each H-1B worker actually creates employment for 7.5 workers in small to mid-sized technology companies.As with the rest of our immigration system, the insufficient number of H-1B visas goes to a deeper problem of having an inflexible system that cannot respond to the demands of an ever-changing economy. Absent a few years of temporary increases, the cap on H-1B visas for skilled workers with bachelor’s degrees has been set at 65,000 per year for over 20 years. Because demand far exceeds supply the cap runs out every year; last year it ran out in only a few days.

Based on last year’s demand, Matthew Slaughter, an economist at Dartmouth who designed the jobs loss calculator, estimates that 100,000 more H-1B jobs could have been filled last year but for the cap. Slaughter estimates that 400,000 additional jobs were lost indirectly based on lost job creation both by the immigrant-hiring companies and by the suppliers of these companies not hiring additional U.S. workers. Notably, both legislation that passed the Senate in 2013 and various House proposals include an increase in the H-1B visa cap. Reform of the H-1B visa program and other skilled-worker programs is essential to grow our economy, balance our budget, and foster job growth, innovation and productivity while maintaining our competitive edge in the international technology industry.

Update Date: Marzo 29 2014

Source: American Immigration Council.